prevent football finger injuriesFootball, America’s new favorite past time. Whether it’s full-contact football or flag football with friends at the park, most of us are aware of and take precautions against serious injuries. But hand and finger injuries are often overlooked. Research shows that 48% of all football injuries involve the hands and fingers.

There was a retrospective study done of injuries that occurred during 10 football seasons between 1996 and 2005. The results show that a total of 1385 hand injuries were documented. Of those injuries, 48% involved the fingers. The studies showed that offensive and defensive linesman were most likely to sustain over all hand injuries. Wide receivers and secondary defensive players more often sustained finger specific injuries.

Today with the innovation of wearable technology, Grappz™ finger support compression gloves, solve the problem that athletic tape could not. Grappz™ offers finger protection without compromising mobility and they’re as efficient as wearing a compression sleeve. Unlike tape, the 4-way stretch compression fabric has elasticity allowing your fingers to fully retract and extend, providing mobility to maneuver your fingers better than if you tape them. The compression tightly conjoins or ‘buddy tapes’ those two fingers together as a splint for support and they’ll never slip off. They’re also quick and easy to apply, machine washable and won’t leave a sticky residue. 

Wearing Grappz™ supports the healing process, helping counteract pain and swelling. You can wear Grappz™ in a football game either to help prevent a finger injury or as a support after you’ve already sustained an injured finger. Grappz™ is not just for protection but you can also improve performance and increase your grip strength from the finger synergy created by 2 fingers working together. Below are the most common football hand and finger injuries that could put you on the sidelines.

Common Football Injuries

Injury:

Mallet Finger

Affects:

Tendon

Description:

The inability to extend or straighten end joint of finger without assistance or a lot of pain. Fingers have no muscles; tendons extend from knuckles to tip, allowing for movement. In Mallet finger, the extensor tendon (tendon running along the back of the finger) is torn away from the tip of the finger

Causes:

Stubbing or striking the finger-tip (jamming) causing it to bend backwards from a tackle or miscalculated ball catch.

Aftermath:

You must wear a splint and keep the finger straight at all times! Failure to do so can result in improper healing and the patient will be left with a drooping finger

Injury:

Jersey Finger

Affects:

Tendon

Description:

Inability to flex finger. A tendon injury that prevents active bending of the finger. It is caused by deep cuts that injure the tendon as well as surrounding blood vessels and nerves.

Causes:

Gripping and holding another athlete or another athlete’s clothing

Aftermath:

Use ice, rest, and consult specialist for further treatment or surgery

Injury:

Sprain/Hyperextension/Jam

Affects:

Ligament

Description:

Sprains are the stretching and tearing of a ligament –tough bands of tissue that connects two bones together in joints. Sprains or hypertensions are a painful joint alignment injury that is similar but less severe than a dislocation. They are both caused when a joint is extended out of its normal alignment. Hyperextended fingers do not dislocate fully but can cause strain in ligaments and tendons. A finger jam occurs to the middle joint of your finger, which is caused by direct force on the tip of the finger.

Causes:

Falling while outstretched, jammed fingers (directional impact at the tip), directional impact pushing finger against the joint, miscalculation of a ball catch or explosive contact with another player.

Injury:

Finger Dislocation

Affects:

Joint

Description:

A dislocation occurs when a bone is pushed out of alignment from its joints. Directional impact to the bone pushes the finger in a direction where it is not meant to bend.

Causes:

A single fingers direct impact or collision with a ball, another player, or falling while outstretched to ground.

Aftermath:

Once you have dislocated a joint you are more susceptible to more dislocations, it is advisable to work with a physical therapist or a doctor to do strength and stability exercises